There is an interesting substance relatively new to conventional medicine. It is recently under patent for cancer therapy and already being tested for colon cancer at the University in Switzerland.

This substance has been shown to increase oxygen in the heart (in the case of cardiac disease) but additionally in tumor cells ranging from hepatoma, colon, pancreas, ovarian, breast, melanoma and more in animal models in vitro and in vivo.

The extra oxygen in tumor cells appears to help decrease tumor growth and enhance the response to conventional therapy. There are multiple mechanisms proposed including altering the Hypoxia inducible factor 1, which opens from its closed ring form in low oxygen tension of cancer cells to drive tumor replication. With the added oxygen from this compound, the ring closes and the replication is decreased.

This compound also reduces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to compromise the blood supply to tumors. Most likely, it also effects the mitochondria in tumor cells, which in cancer is hyperpolarized leading to a blockage of pyruvate entering the mitochondria and instead enters the cori cycle to make lactic acid, another factor in reducing oxygen availability in tumor cells.

What is this compound? It is called Myo inositol trispyrophosphate or ITPP for short.

ITPP has been studied as early as 2011 but only recently has it been tested in cancer patients. It had previously been used on horses by increasing their stamina and speed. Alas, this gave it a bad name as a doping drug  rather than as a life saving drug for cancer and heart disease. Therefore it was not generally accepted for any medical applications in the past.

We now know that it may indeed be a lifesaver for patients with cancer, especially those with resistance to other therapies.

Is this a cure all for patients with cancer? Most likely ITPP is an adjuvant for other cancer therapies. After a detoxification from all the tumor inhabitants that caused the cancer in the first place (including eliminating heavy metals, bacteria, fungi, parasites, chemicals such as pesticides and viruses), the use of ITPP may be even more effective in helping to reverse cancers and give patients their lives back.

These are exciting times for cancer research, providing new tools for saving lives. Older drugs with outdated reputations are now emerging as potential lifesavers.

Dr. med univ, Dana F. Flavin, President www.collmed.org

References:

Exploiting tumor hypoxia for cancer treatment

Development of OXY111A, a Novel Hypoxia Modifier

Increasing the oxygen load by treatment with myo-inositol trispyrophosphate reduces growth of colon cancer and modulates the intestine homeobox gene Cdx2

The Allosteric Hemoglobin Effector ITPP Inhibits Metastatic Colon Cancer in Mice

Myo‐inositol trispyrophosphate‐mediated hypoxia reversion controls pancreatic cancer in rodents and enhances gemcitabine efficacy

Increasing the oxygen load by treatment with myo-inositol trispyrophosphate reduces growth of colon cancer and modulates the intestine homeobox gene Cdx2

Antihypoxic Potentiation of Standard Therapy for Experimental Colorectal Liver Metastasis through Myo-Inositol Trispyrophosphate

Development of a methodology for in vivo follow-up of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatocyte specific Trim24-null mice treated with myo-inositol trispyrophosphate

Increasing the oxygen load by treatment with myo-inositol trispyrophosphate reduces growth of colon cancer and modulates the intestine homeobox gene Cdx2

Myo-inositol trispyrophosphate-mediated hypoxia reversion controls pancreatic cancer in rodents and enhances gemcitabine efficacy

Increasing the oxygen load by treatment with myo-inositol trispyrophosphate reduces growth of colon cancer and modulates the intestine homeobox gene Cdx2