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Are we taking control of our own lives and choosing to heal and be healthy?

 

Over my decades in practice, I’ve witnessed many patients who think someone else should be responsible for getting them well. But we are in charge of our own health and have the capacity to reverse illness and get better. Why don’t we see that? Why do we revert back to old mindsets instead of taking charge?

First and foremost, we have to want to get well.

This might sound ridiculous to some but there are actually people who want to remain ill because of the attention they get from it. Getting well also takes work and some simply won’t do what’s required. It’s more comfortable to perpetually be a “patient.” This isn’t due to laziness but an emotional wall from childhood that triggers earlier pain and victimhood.

Being an adult means stepping away from that infantilized mindset and taking care of oneself more completely and maturely. It means taking control, not relinquishing it, to medical professionals or loved ones. It requires growing up, whether you want to or not…because your life may depend on it.

This may not seem easy for some, near impossible for others. But it can be done and must be done. We need to face our old inner demons and imperfect pasts. We must release old anger, resentment, grief and disappointment, just like any other toxin. And we must move toward health again, both physically but equally as important, mentally and emotionally.

I call it “cleaning up your act.” And for each person, this may mean something different. Ask yourself:

 

What do you need to heal on ALL levels?

 

Cleaning up your act goes beyond organic foods or regular exercise or the right supplement. It includes meditation, forgiveness, stress management and the deep and cathartic release of old, stagnant grief.

Ask yourself:

What choices are you making to tend to your mental health?

How do we stop playing victim to the past, clean the psychological slate and realize: we can cure ourselves from the inside out. 

Sound like more than you can do? Help someone else then. Helping others when you can’t help yourself kickstarts the healing process. Here are 20 ways to be of service to others.

When we help others, we realize we’re not alone in our pain and suffering. We share the burden together. We get outside of ourselves so when we return, we have a fresher perspective.

Don’t let another day go by without tending to your previous pain. You deserve freedom from the past and a future you can look forward to!

Prof.(hon) Dr. Dana F. Flavin, Dr. med univ, M.S.

Dr. Flavin is educated in Psychology, Pharmacology, Nutrient Biochemistry and Medicine

President of www.collmed.dev.cc a Research Foundation for Medicine in USA, teaching colleagues and patients around the world about Medicine, Health and the Newest Medical Research toward cures.